“Prospetto della Porta del Popolo in Roma”

prospetto

 

Prospetto della Porta del Popolo in Roma

Prospect of the ‘Porta del Popolo‘, designed but never built.

Signed and dated “Antonio Presottini delineo’ ad 1797“.

Note the Papal coats of arms of Pope Pius VI (25 December 1717 – 29 August 1799), born Count Giovanni Angelo Braschi.

 

Pope Pius VI (1717 – 1799), born Count Giovanni Angelo Braschi, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 15 February 1775 to his death in 1799.

Pius VI put the papal finances on a firmer basis; drained the marshy lands near Città della Pieve, Perugia, Spoleto, and Trevi; deepened the harbours of Porto d’Anzio and Terracina; added a new sacristy to the Basilica of St. Peter; completed the Museum of Pio-Clementino, and enriched it with many costly pieces of art; restored the Via Appia; and drained the greater part of the Pontine Marshes.

This important restauration plan included the magnificent Porta del Popolo in Piazza del Popolo. In 1798 Pius VI commissioned the project of the New Prospectus of Porta del Popolo with his family coat of arms (Braschi), in order to leave a visible sign of his papacy in the architecture of Rome itself.

The Prospetto di Porta del Popolo is one of the project of this immense Rome renovation project, an important evidence of a peculiar time in the history of the papacy in Rome.

Unfortunately, the project was never realised. In 1796 French troops commanded by Napoleon Bonaparte defeated the papal troops and occupied the Papal States. In 1798, upon his refusal to renounce his temporal power, Pius was taken prisoner and transported to France. He died one year later in Valence. His reign is the fourth-longest in papal history, being over two decades.

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Oil Painting

Man in suit painting_NF_01

Man in suit painting_01

Anonymous artist
Portrait of most probably George Finlay (1799 – 1875), Scottish historian and classicist.
Oil painting on wood panel
Original frame
England
1830 ca.
Picture 35 x 30 cm.
Picture with frame 45 x 42 cm.

Carl Werner – Studies of a seated man and spinner in Renaissance costume

Vangelli Gallery

Carl Friedrich Heinrich Werner (1808 – 1894)

Study of a seated man in Renaissance costume, 1848

Graphite and watercolour on paper

43 x 28 cm.

Inscriptions: (bottom left) Studie (SIC) for the picture of the “Poor Man” / Sir Francis Scott’s; (bottom right) C. Werner. f., 1848.

It is a preparatory study, then changed to one of the characters, traditionally identified as a prelate, of the Interno Veneziano auctioned at Christie’s in New York in 2010 (New York, Rockefeller Plaza, Sale 2282, Old Master & 19th Century Paintings, Drawings, & Watercolors, 27 January 2010).
(Alessandra Imbellone)

Behind the first drawing there is:

Vangelli Gallery

Carl Friedrich Heinrich Werner (1808 – 1894)

Study of spinner in Renaissance costume, 1848

Graphite on paper

It is a preparatory study, then changed to one of the characters of the Interno Veneziano auctioned at Christie’s in New York in 2010 (New York, Rockefeller Plaza Sale 2282, Old Master & 19th Century Paintings, Drawings, & Watercolors , 27 January 2010). It can be dated with certainty to 1848 as this is the date affixed by the author on another preparatory drawing for the same composition.

(Alessandra Imbellone)

 

Carl Werner – Mass at the Colosseum

Vangelli Gallery

Carl Friedrich Heinrich Werner (1808 – 1894)

Preaching in the Colosseum

Tempera on coloured paper

55 x 34 cm.

1850 ca

This tempera depicts the sermon given by a Capuchin friar inside the Colosseum, from an eighteenth century wooden pulpit, in the presence of faithful and pilgrims in Ciociarian costume. This subject was particularly loved by Nordic artists who worked in Rome in the nineteenth century, such as the Danish Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg who used this kind of scenes in the second decade of the century. The publisher Audot made this subject popular in incisions.
(Alessandra Imbellone)